IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

17 Pages V  « < 9 10 11 12 13 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Petrol prices in Newbury
Andy Capp
post Oct 4 2013, 09:40 AM
Post #201


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 11,878
Joined: 3-September 09
Member No.: 317



QUOTE (Biker1 @ Oct 4 2013, 06:07 AM) *
I'm sure, but it seems many on here aren't.
Surely you can see that the price of petrol is governed by many different factors to that of houses even if you are unsure why petrol should be more round here.
Take Andy's prices above. I was in Oxford last week and the price of fuel was less than Newbury.
Doesn't work does it?

+1 wink.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
motormad
post Oct 5 2013, 10:36 PM
Post #202


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 1,970
Joined: 29-December 09
From: Dogging in a car park somewhere
Member No.: 592



I'm in Edinburgh at the moment and I cannae tell youz that petrol is 1.28 at Asda.


--------------------
:p
Grammar: the difference between knowing your poop and knowing you're poop.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Biker1
post Oct 6 2013, 08:29 AM
Post #203


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 5,021
Joined: 26-May 09
Member No.: 103



According to this site there is a vast difference across the UK.
And we are nowhere near the top!! cool.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Cognosco
post Oct 6 2013, 11:42 AM
Post #204


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 2,452
Joined: 31-October 10
Member No.: 1,212



QUOTE (Biker1 @ Oct 6 2013, 09:29 AM) *
According to this site there is a vast difference across the UK.
And we are nowhere near the top!! cool.gif


Well I am sure they will soon rectify that as soon as they read this! rolleyes.gif


--------------------
Vexatious Candidate?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Richard Garvie
post Oct 8 2013, 07:42 PM
Post #205


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 2,974
Joined: 8-September 10
Member No.: 1,076



QUOTE (Andy Capp @ Oct 2 2013, 10:22 PM) *
Richard, can you not find out why we supermarkets price things differently in different areas? That is to say, why are they lower in similarly sized towns else where? What is the driver, or threshold that effects the price?


Tesco and Sainsbury's simply match the lowest price. ASDA pride themselves on being the cheapest on fuel / grocery prices and competitors will only ever match them where they have a store. The recent fuel price reductions were part of a move by all retailers to cut prices in line with supply costs which fell a few weeks ago. As fuel is bought in advance, it usually takes a few weeks for the savings to be passed on (if at all).

What you'll find is ASDA don't do fuel price gimmicks like "spend £50 to get 5p off", they just charge the cheapest price they can. Other retailers try to boost sales in store by offering the loyalty coupons.

I asked lots of questions of the CEO at TESCO and also Justin King at Sainsbury's, and let's say Phil Clarke wasn't best pleased!! To be fair to Sainsbury's, they basically said there wasn't a law against charging more when there was not a discounter in certain markets, and they are right. Until the government look at the price manipulation, they will carry on doing it.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
NWNREADER
post Oct 8 2013, 07:47 PM
Post #206


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 3,414
Joined: 20-November 10
Member No.: 1,265



I see the price at Tesco has gone up 1p.......
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Richard Garvie
post Oct 8 2013, 07:50 PM
Post #207


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 2,974
Joined: 8-September 10
Member No.: 1,076



QUOTE (NWNREADER @ Oct 8 2013, 08:47 PM) *
I see the price at Tesco has gone up 1p.......


It will. When they drop like they did, it's usually in reaction to cuts by ASDA and Morrisons. If you look at the headlines in the Standard etc over the past few weeks, they typically read "ASDA to cut fuel by 3p" "Morrisons to follow ASDA on fuel price cut" and then there will be something about the others. Tesco and Sainsbury's always the last to lower prices, and shortly after they float slowly up. Wait until Xmas, and the bank holidays. Sainsbury's are renowned for putting 2p on the price of fuel for the bank holiday days, and then it drops again. Very, very strange.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Andy Capp
post Oct 8 2013, 10:19 PM
Post #208


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 11,878
Joined: 3-September 09
Member No.: 317



QUOTE (Richard Garvie @ Oct 8 2013, 08:42 PM) *
I asked lots of questions of the CEO at TESCO and also Justin King at Sainsbury's, and let's say Phil Clarke wasn't best pleased!! To be fair to Sainsbury's, they basically said there wasn't a law against charging more when there was not a discounter in certain markets, and they are right. Until the government look at the price manipulation, they will carry on doing it.

In effect, you are saying there is a lack of local competition.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dannyboy
post Oct 9 2013, 11:00 AM
Post #209


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 6,056
Joined: 14-May 09
From: Bouvetøya
Member No.: 51



QUOTE (Andy Capp @ Oct 8 2013, 11:19 PM) *
In effect, you are saying there is a lack of local competition.

No I think he is saying 'Can I have a job please ASDA'
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Simon Kirby
post Oct 9 2013, 11:24 AM
Post #210


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 6,326
Joined: 20-July 10
From: Wash Common
Member No.: 1,011



QUOTE (Richard Garvie @ Oct 8 2013, 08:42 PM) *
Until the government look at the price manipulation, they will carry on doing it.

You lose credibility talking about "price manipulation". This is just how the free-market works, and even if there isn't a "discounter" in Newbury the market is still perfectly free because there is plenty of competition and consumers are free to buy from where they choose, be that around Newbury or at the other end of any regular commute.

You vision of the government fixing this "price manipulation" shouts loud of the very worst kind of socialist big-state centralist meddling - very much like Red Ed's idea of fixing energy prices.


--------------------
Right an injustice - give Simon Kirby his allotment back!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
dannyboy
post Oct 9 2013, 11:26 AM
Post #211


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 6,056
Joined: 14-May 09
From: Bouvetøya
Member No.: 51



QUOTE (Simon Kirby @ Oct 9 2013, 12:24 PM) *
You lose credibility talking about "price manipulation". This is just how the free-market works, and even if there isn't a "discounter" in Newbury the market is still perfectly free because there is plenty of competition and consumers are free to buy from where they choose, be that around Newbury or at the other end of any regular commute.

You vision of the government fixing this "price manipulation" shouts loud of the very worst kind of socialist big-state centralist meddling - very much like Red Ed's idea of fixing energy prices.

Hear Hear!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Andy Capp
post Oct 9 2013, 12:29 PM
Post #212


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 11,878
Joined: 3-September 09
Member No.: 317



QUOTE (Simon Kirby @ Oct 9 2013, 12:24 PM) *
You lose credibility talking about "price manipulation". This is just how the free-market works, and even if there isn't a "discounter" in Newbury the market is still perfectly free because there is plenty of competition and consumers are free to buy from where they choose, be that around Newbury or at the other end of any regular commute.

You vision of the government fixing this "price manipulation" shouts loud of the very worst kind of socialist big-state centralist meddling - very much like Red Ed's idea of fixing energy prices.

So 'free market' = best? What Newbury exemplifies is what happens when you have a postcode lottery.

The illusion of choice.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Andy Capp
post Oct 9 2013, 12:30 PM
Post #213


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 11,878
Joined: 3-September 09
Member No.: 317



QUOTE (dannyboy @ Oct 9 2013, 12:00 PM) *
No I think he is saying 'Can I have a job please ASDA'

So I was right first time.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
newres
post Oct 9 2013, 03:28 PM
Post #214


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 2,522
Joined: 27-November 12
Member No.: 8,961



QUOTE (Simon Kirby @ Oct 9 2013, 12:24 PM) *
You lose credibility talking about "price manipulation". This is just how the free-market works, and even if there isn't a "discounter" in Newbury the market is still perfectly free because there is plenty of competition and consumers are free to buy from where they choose, be that around Newbury or at the other end of any regular commute.

You vision of the government fixing this "price manipulation" shouts loud of the very worst kind of socialist big-state centralist meddling - very much like Red Ed's idea of fixing energy prices.

I feel uneasy about a supermarket charging a different price for the same item in different parts of the country. They control our food right through the supply chain. It perhaps isn't manipulation, but it smacks of profiteering.

Incidentally, I don't think Ed Milliband was talking about fixing prices. More, he seemed to be implying tighter regulation. A good thing I think.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Andy Capp
post Oct 9 2013, 03:48 PM
Post #215


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 11,878
Joined: 3-September 09
Member No.: 317



Due to the intrinsic value of fuel compared to, say, chocolate, I think they should be treated a little differently. The biggest enemy of fuel buyers, however, is the commodities market. Ultimately, the price of fuel is 'fixed'.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Hatter
post Oct 9 2013, 04:11 PM
Post #216


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 287
Joined: 11-September 13
Member No.: 10,046



QUOTE (newres @ Oct 9 2013, 04:28 PM) *
I feel uneasy about a supermarket charging a different price for the same item in different parts of the country. They control our food right through the supply chain. It perhaps isn't manipulation, but it smacks of profiteering.

Incidentally, I don't think Ed Milliband was talking about fixing prices. More, he seemed to be implying tighter regulation. A good thing I think.


The Regulator agreed that my season ticket should go up dread to think what they'd do to petrol prices.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
On the edge
post Oct 9 2013, 04:30 PM
Post #217


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 7,847
Joined: 23-May 09
From: Newbury
Member No.: 98



The big four supermarkets have played an absolute blinder, they are an oligopoly. Probably one of the key reasons they've failed in the US. That's why it's such a good fit with retail oil.

Milliband's regulatory quest isn't likely to succeed if it's based on the British model - as the Hatter rightly points out, their record as customer champion isn't distinguished.

Our market trading model has to change so that participants see it as a marathon rather than a horse race. Until then, you won't see any change in behaviour.


--------------------
Know your place!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Simon Kirby
post Oct 9 2013, 04:31 PM
Post #218


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 6,326
Joined: 20-July 10
From: Wash Common
Member No.: 1,011



QUOTE (newres @ Oct 9 2013, 04:28 PM) *
I feel uneasy about a supermarket charging a different price for the same item in different parts of the country. They control our food right through the supply chain. It perhaps isn't manipulation, but it smacks of profiteering.

If it was one single supermarket that controlled the whole market then that wouldn't be a free market and the lack of competition would be a problem, with higher prices and poor efficiency. As it is there are a number of independent supermarkets competing with each other and competing too against a range of smaller local players so it's as free as a market can be, and food is more or less cheaper now than it has ever been.

If a shop (be it supermarket, corner shop, farmers market, whatever) had cornered the supply of a scarce and desirable commodity and was taking advantage of the consumer's need and their monopoly of supply by selling the commodity at an inflated price then that would be profiteering, but simply charging a different price for an item in different locations is just good business nous, taking advantage of the regional differences in taste and affluence. You wouldn't expect independent retailers to charge the exact same price for the same item in different locations - why would they - so I don't see why you'd expect different branches of the same retailer to charge the same unless the retailer was so centralised and rigid that it's systems couldn't cope with regional differences, and I doubt any national that inflexible would last long outside of a socialist autocracy.

QUOTE (newres @ Oct 9 2013, 04:28 PM) *
Incidentally, I don't think Ed Milliband was talking about fixing prices. More, he seemed to be implying tighter regulation. A good thing I think.


Milliband is quoted as saying "For too long the companies have been able to over-charge people. Somebody's got to stand up and be counted. We're absolutely confident the companies can stomach this, can make this happen, and we're going to make this happen. That's why we'll freeze energy bills until the beginning of 2017 if we win the election. That will benefit 1.5 million businesses across our country, make a big difference to them."


--------------------
Right an injustice - give Simon Kirby his allotment back!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
newres
post Oct 9 2013, 04:40 PM
Post #219


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 2,522
Joined: 27-November 12
Member No.: 8,961



QUOTE (Simon Kirby @ Oct 9 2013, 05:31 PM) *
If a shop (be it supermarket, corner shop, farmers market, whatever) had cornered the supply of a scarce and desirable commodity and was taking advantage of the consumer's need and their monopoly of supply by selling the commodity at an inflated price then that would be profiteering, but simply charging a different price for an item in different locations is just good business nous, taking advantage of the regional differences in taste and affluence. You wouldn't expect independent retailers to charge the exact same price for the same item in different locations - why would they - so I don't see why you'd expect different branches of the same retailer to charge the same unless the retailer was so centralised and rigid that it's systems couldn't cope with regional differences, and I doubt any national that inflexible would last long outside of a socialist autocracy.

"

But they don't charge different prices for anything else. Just fuel.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
On the edge
post Oct 9 2013, 04:45 PM
Post #220


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 7,847
Joined: 23-May 09
From: Newbury
Member No.: 98



Big Ed's proposal would be quite easy to deliver, but be very careful what you wish for. Most of the big energy companies offer fixed term deals. They'd just make that compulsory. What happens at the end of the period? I think we know the answer!

I'm old enough to remember (just!) Darlin' Arold doing the same thing back in the 70s. Electricity prices were held down; but a 'fuel cost adjustment' was introduced to cover the 'very genuine increases in the price of coal at the pit'. Electricity didn't go up, prices were simply adjusted that way!

If we really want to bring prices down, do we know some like minded transport drivers?


--------------------
Know your place!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

17 Pages V  « < 9 10 11 12 13 > » 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
2 User(s) are reading this topic (2 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 

Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 14th November 2019 - 12:09 PM