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> 3 pin socket covers do more harm than good, Not adding to safety
gel
post Aug 5 2012, 11:15 AM
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3 pin electrical sockets:
Safe as they are!



Came across this www (below) which may be of interest to those with tiny tots at home.
These socket covers increasingly seen at public places eg hotel lobbies I note too:
no doubt under some Health & Safety guidance...which it seems is flawed.

Click me!!
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Timbo
post Aug 5 2012, 11:24 AM
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Particularly bored this Sunday?

Never did understand putting fake socket covers in. Always made less sense to me than when you just leave them alone.. Kind of a case of spoiling the broth by messing around with it..
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Nothing Much
post Aug 5 2012, 01:41 PM
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Interestingly... or not. I had an outside socket installed by an electrician.
It failed after a few years. It was meant to be safe in the garden for power tools.

I dismantled it and found a failed spring. I complained and as I had only sent a partial component
I was given a brush off.

So I bought another(cheaper alternative)
Blow me down 10 months later I got a new unit in the post. I still have not installed it yet.Yes I am lazy.
No comment in the covering note.

I expect where children's fingers are concerned one would try harder.
ce
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Exhausted
post Aug 5 2012, 04:10 PM
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QUOTE (Nothing Much @ Aug 5 2012, 02:41 PM) *
Interestingly... or not. I had an outside socket installed by an electrician.
It failed after a few years. It was meant to be safe in the garden for power tools.

I dismantled it and found a failed spring. I complained and as I had only sent a partial component
I was given a brush off.

So I bought another(cheaper alternative)
Blow me down 10 months later I got a new unit in the post. I still have not installed it yet.Yes I am lazy.
No comment in the covering note.

I expect where children's fingers are concerned one would try harder.
ce

'A few years', tell me you really didn't really bother to get a replacement under warranty for an object that only cost a couple of quid after you spent time taking it apart. You really do lead an exciting life.

I have always maintained that those socket blanks are dangerous. What is more dangerous however are people who overload sockets and damage them and then do not get them replaced.
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Nothing Much
post Aug 5 2012, 04:41 PM
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Fair comment the original was £ 150.00 The alternative was about £90.00. My kids are bigger than me. Only use it for music.
No fingers are involved
The chap who takes care of the garden has a proper cable as well with stuff.. So he is safe.
it had all sorts of funny electrical blockings . I really should put it back. RCDs I think.I like my chainsaw so perhaps a job for the summer! When that happens.
ce
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user23
post Aug 5 2012, 05:43 PM
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I'm not sure people should be giving electrical advice unless they're qualified to do so.
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Nothing Much
post Aug 5 2012, 06:23 PM
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Probably why it has been in a jiffy bag for a few years.
ce
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massifheed
post Aug 6 2012, 08:35 AM
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QUOTE (gel @ Aug 5 2012, 12:15 PM) *
...which it seems is flawed.


It's the information on the website that seems to be flawed to me. Their arguments against socket covers seem to be that many covers can be easily removed by children, and also that UK sockets don't need any extra protection as they have safety built in.

I have kids and do indeed use socket covers at home. The main reason for this is because (even though the website suggests it's very difficult) it's actually increadibly easy to defeat the earth pin 'safety' feature they are banging on about with a lot of items that kids may be able to get their hands on. I tried it with the lid of a biro and, sure enough, it's possible to get the pen lid to stay in the socket therefore exposing the live and neutral parts. With a decent socket cover this can't happen.

As far as socket covers being easily removable goes, I'm sure common sense on the part of the adult installing them would solve this perceived problem. If you install a socket cover and it's loose, remove it and get one that fits!

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On the edge
post Aug 6 2012, 09:05 AM
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Perhaps we ought to start thinking about lower and therefore safer voltages. Quite feasible and experiments seem to be ongoing. Maybe new build initially.


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Biker1
post Aug 6 2012, 09:09 AM
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QUOTE (On the edge @ Aug 6 2012, 10:05 AM) *
Perhaps we ought to start thinking about lower and therefore safer voltages. Quite feasible and experiments seem to be ongoing. Maybe new build initially.

I presume you are thinking of 110V?

The cost of this would be phenomenal and may be logistically almost impossible.
You would have to change the whole of the UK electricity distribution system and, at the same time, change every electrical appliance, right down to the last light bulb.
You would also probably have to re-wire most, if not all premises, as lower voltage appliances take more current and would therefore need more heavy duty wiring.
All at the same time!!
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dannyboy
post Aug 6 2012, 10:01 AM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Aug 6 2012, 10:09 AM) *
I presume you are thinking of 110V?

The cost of this would be phenomenal and may be logistically almost impossible.
You would have to change the whole of the UK electricity distribution system and, at the same time, change every electrical appliance, right down to the last light bulb.
You would also probably have to re-wire most, if not all premises, as lower voltage appliances take more current and would therefore need more heavy duty wiring.
All at the same time!!

You can easily run a 240v appliance on 110v supply. It just does not work as fast.

Don't do it the other way round though....
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On the edge
post Aug 6 2012, 10:42 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Aug 6 2012, 11:01 AM) *
You can easily run a 240v appliance on 110v supply. It just does not work as fast.

Don't do it the other way round though....


Now take that one stage further. Most electronic appliances run on about 50v DC - which means they need transformers to use 'mains' voltages. That means TVs, computers, radios etc etc. all 'waste' energy converting. LED lights work LV DC as well. So, you could have an internal wiring at 12v DC - just right for micro generation....

May be just a dream but distinct possibilities and far far safer! Of course, the big stuff (washers / cookers) would need a bigger oomph - but that's just how they do it in the States. Ovens there are often 3 phase.


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JeffG
post Aug 6 2012, 10:42 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Aug 6 2012, 11:01 AM) *
You can easily run a 240v appliance on 110v supply. It just does not work as fast.

So the only effect on a TV set would be that everything is in slow motion, right? Yes, my comment is just as silly as your statement.
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dannyboy
post Aug 6 2012, 11:05 AM
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QUOTE (JeffG @ Aug 6 2012, 11:42 AM) *
So the only effect on a TV set would be that everything is in slow motion, right? Yes, my comment is just as silly as your statement.

Certain applicances. Such as a 240v drill. I have done it.

If you under volt an electric lamp, ie stick a 240v 100w lamp in a 110v circuit it will last far far longer than if in a 240v circuit. It won't give off as much light mind....
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Biker1
post Aug 6 2012, 11:45 AM
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Biker1
post Aug 6 2012, 11:45 AM
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If you plugged 240V appliances with high current drain such as washing machines, dishwashers, electric fires etc. into 110V the current drain would be so high it would blow all the circuit breakers in your house!
It is HIGHLY DANGEROUS to plug an appliance matched to a certain voltage into a different voltage supply be it higher or lower voltage. ohmy.gif
Always match the appliance to the supply voltage!
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dannyboy
post Aug 6 2012, 11:47 AM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Aug 6 2012, 12:45 PM) *
If you plugged 240V appliances with high current drain such as washing machines, dishwashers, electric fires etc. into 110V the current drain would be so high it would blow all the circuit breakers in your house!
It is HIGHLY DANGEROUS to plug an appliance matched to a certain voltage into a different voltage supply be it higher or lower voltage. ohmy.gif
Always match the appliance to the supply voltage!

LOL, I didn't say it wasn't without danger......see them cables glow.....
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Biker1
post Aug 6 2012, 11:47 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Aug 6 2012, 12:47 PM) *
LOL, I didn't say it wasn't without danger......see them cables glow.....
laugh.gif
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On the edge
post Aug 6 2012, 12:25 PM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Aug 6 2012, 12:47 PM) *
LOL, I didn't say it wasn't without danger......see them cables glow.....


Can do you a nice re chargeable electric drill - but you'd get one cheaper at B&Q!

On the voltage difference front, we can get lulled into a sense of false security as many small appliances are dual voltage - particularly the 'travel ' stuff. My reasonably new Philishave is just plug and go.


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JeffG
post Aug 6 2012, 02:15 PM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Aug 6 2012, 12:45 PM) *
If you plugged 240V appliances with high current drain such as washing machines, dishwashers, electric fires etc. into 110V the current drain would be so high it would blow all the circuit breakers in your house!

Sorry, but that is absolute nonsense. I suggest you need to revise Ohm's Law
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