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> Cycling in West Berks, cycling casualties
Bloggo
post Jun 22 2012, 10:24 AM
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QUOTE (Andy Capp @ Jun 22 2012, 11:17 AM) *
I'm not sure of anything, indeed, what does it matter if I am or not? What I will say is: I know who Iommi is in real life.

Hummmmm, interesting.


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Bloggo
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Andy Capp
post Jun 22 2012, 10:25 AM
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QUOTE (Bloggo @ Jun 22 2012, 11:24 AM) *
Hummmmm, interesting.

Like I said: and your point is is what?
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badmummajamma
post Jun 22 2012, 10:51 AM
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When I lived in Reading I used to cycle 3 miles (running the gauntlet) to work most mornings and tend to do quite a bit of long distance road riding these days - in fact, I cycled from Lowestoft to Land's End last week without using the pavement once.

Having said that, I also drive, love motorsport and am generally a massive petrol head so I'm certainly not a militant cyclist.

I think 95% of drivers are patient and respectful enough to wait long enough to be able to pass you with a wide berth (at least a car's width). In 500 miles last week, I only had one or two cars come within a few feet - after which they received wholly justified single finger jestures.

While getting stuck behind a cyclist on a winding country road can be frustrating, to my mind there is no point getting irate about it because to do anything that wait patiently for a safe place to overtake is dangerous and could threaten someone's life.

A lot of motorists, particularly those who don't cycle, lose appreciation of the effect of gradients, sustained effort, pothole/manhole avoidance, braking in a straight line before a corner, lack of stopping power in general etc that a cyclist has to deal with.

Getting "stuck" behind a cyclist on decent sized town roads is usually the result of a nervous or overly cautious driver - not the cyclist. Most roads are more than wide enough for a safe overtaking manouvre and it's the responsibility of the person making the manouvre to do it safely - which may mean waiting a few seconds.

In this scenario, the worst thing that will happen to the driver is mild inconvinience. The worst thing that will happen to the cyclist as a result of the impatient driver is life-long paralysis or death. Perspective needs to be maintained here.

Riding on pavements on a bike is not feasible - I've got a lightweight carbon road bike which does allow me to cycle quite comfortably at around 20-25mph on the flat - but this sort of speed would be dangerous to pedestrians (walking chicanes to cyclists) and, with skinny tires, I'd pick up endless puntures from the c**p/roots/glass/foliage on the pavement.

Cycle lanes are fine, but would cost so much to implement on a useable scale that they're unfeasible. As the cost of running a private vehicle continues to rise, more and more people are going to opt to cycle. Recreational cycling in the UK is growing at a massive rate at the moment as well, and, as a nation, we're pretty good at competitive cycling - which serves to promote the sport.

I think the only thing cyclists owe to motorists is consistency and to use the roads in a way that a car would. This means getting in the correct lane at roundabouts, waiting at traffic lights, being in the middle fo the road for right hand turns at junctions etc, maintaining a constant distance from the kerb etc. If all cyclists do this, then I really don't see that motorists have any cause for complaint.



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badmummajamma
post Jun 22 2012, 10:56 AM
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On that last point about consistency, I think road use of bicycles in this manner (ie do as a car would) should be conditional on everyone completing a cycling proficiency test. (How you police this, I don't know.)

This should be compulsory at school (perhaps around year 6 age) and will actually help young people learn to drive safely as well when they're a bit older - not to mention giving all road users an appreciation of what it is like to cycle on the road.
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Timbo
post Jun 22 2012, 11:02 AM
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It's nice that you posted up a well rounded post, as a biker I can understand where you're coming from but at the same time I guess your high speed carbon racing bike probably is a bit overkill for the majority of the time? Maybe get a normal bicycle to ride to work, if your commute included the hambridge road.
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badmummajamma
post Jun 22 2012, 12:17 PM
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I don't cycle commute anymore - I'm afraid I now live an unsustainable distance from my new job - so have to drive (it's not on a feasible train or bus line).

My cycling is for pleasure/fitness only these days, so I tend to get me and my carbon road bike as far away from towns as quickly as I can. The West Berkshire/South Oxfordshire downlands are great for this.

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Timbo
post Jun 22 2012, 02:31 PM
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On a slightly different note, why do bicyclists insist on wearing stupidly tight clothing?
You are not racing, you are riding to work.

The 0.02 drag co-efficient you'd save is not enough to counteract the fact you look like a device in churches which goes "ding" -end.
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betty swollocks
post Jun 24 2012, 07:25 PM
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QUOTE (Timbo @ Jun 22 2012, 03:31 PM) *
On a slightly different note, why do bicyclists insist on wearing stupidly tight clothing?
You are not racing, you are riding to work.
The 0.02 drag co-efficient you'd save is not enough to counteract the fact you look like a device in churches which goes "ding" -end.


They don't insist: many don't wear tight fitting clothing, but it can be very practical. It might look 'stupidly tight' on you however.
But, it doesn't flap about, doesn't chafe and dries quickly.
This is important on long and/or fast rides, when comfort and maximising efficiency is important. Not so important on short rides - obviously.

Some folk might think (me included) that sitting in a tin box, stuck in yet another traffic jam or tailback, wasting hours and hours of your life away, looks pretty daft too.

You have a real 'thing' against cyclists or cycling or both, don't you Timbo - jealous?


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Timbo
post Jun 24 2012, 07:59 PM
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QUOTE (betty swollocks @ Jun 24 2012, 08:25 PM) *
They don't insist: many don't wear tight fitting clothing, but it can be very practical. It might look 'stupidly tight' on you however.


They look stupidly tight on anyone. Regardless of whether they are tubby or athletic.

QUOTE
But, it doesn't flap about, doesn't chafe and dries quickly.


Neither do my jeans!!!


QUOTE
Some folk might think (me included) that sitting in a tin box, stuck in yet another traffic jam or tailback, wasting hours and hours of your life away, looks pretty daft too.


Just like it's nice to have a radio, and some comfy chairs, and some heating.
I have been a motorcyclist for close to 10 years now. I also spent 2 winters with only motorcycles, no cars during that time - I am more than aware of what it's like to be out in the fresh air. It's very nice. I also occasionally enjoy the odd pedal around with my mates, especially remembering back to when I was 14 or 15 on our little Apollos.... I also rode 2 miles to work and back every day for about 3 weeks.. till I gave up because I COULDN'T BE BOTHERED. After a hard day at work what I wanted was some comfortable, supportive chairs, insulation from the outside world and some Sade on the radio.

What I actually got was a sweaty face, stinky pits and a sore ****. Maybe you like that sort of thing but I for one do not!!

(Probably) unlike you - I can safely say I've had to see both words, and actually with all honesty that in most cases, apart from the once in a blue moon perfect day when the sun is out and it's not too hot, or too cold, or too windy, and the roads aren't busy (not really relevant for you on your pedal-powered crotch-box) that I'd rather be on a bike than in my car.

I prefer being on two wheels than I do on four, but I would rather have a car than a bike (powered or otherwise).

You waste hours and hours of your life away too probably, trying to squeeze into your romper outfit, or try to convince people you're interesting. So we both waste a similar amount of time, just on different things.

And let's be honest my commute by car doesn't really involve any queuing as it's not really into the normal rush hour flow (when I used to work in the centre of Newbury it only took me about 15 or 20 minutes from the far end of Thatcham anyway!!

The last time I got in a queue was heading towards Bournemouth for a day when it was that lovely hot weekend a fortnight or so ago - and let's face it even being stuck in traffic for half an hour I'd have made it there before you. Even if you did have a Chris Hoy Halfords special or whatever it's called.

QUOTE
You have a real 'thing' against cyclists or cycling or both, don't you Timbo - jealous?


Nope, nothing against them at all.
Except the odd militant one who hold up traffic flow or wobble between 1 inch and 4 feet out from the curb. Also the mentality of bikers. Yes you might have the right to use the road but at the end of it, you are the smaller and more feeble beings on the road so instead of trying to be top of the food chain you should settle down into the lower ranks.. Even as a motorcyclist being probably the fastest thing on any given stretch of road, the amount of times that having the "WELL IT'S MY RIGHT....." attitude could have killed me are beyond count.

I think you also take things a little too literally.. as will no doubt be evident by your reply to my clearly, 100% serious, nothing to do with being a bit hyper on Red Bull (yes it STILL affects me..even at my age)
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betty swollocks
post Jun 24 2012, 08:44 PM
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QUOTE (Timbo @ Jun 24 2012, 08:59 PM) *
They look stupidly tight on anyone. Regardless of whether they are tubby or athletic.



Neither do my jeans!!!




Just like it's nice to have a radio, and some comfy chairs, and some heating.
I have been a motorcyclist for close to 10 years now. I also spent 2 winters with only motorcycles, no cars during that time - I am more than aware of what it's like to be out in the fresh air. It's very nice. I also occasionally enjoy the odd pedal around with my mates, especially remembering back to when I was 14 or 15 on our little Apollos.... I also rode 2 miles to work and back every day for about 3 weeks.. till I gave up because I COULDN'T BE BOTHERED. After a hard day at work what I wanted was some comfortable, supportive chairs, insulation from the outside world and some Sade on the radio.

What I actually got was a sweaty face, stinky pits and a sore ****. Maybe you like that sort of thing but I for one do not!!

(Probably) unlike you - I can safely say I've had to see both words, and actually with all honesty that in most cases, apart from the once in a blue moon perfect day when the sun is out and it's not too hot, or too cold, or too windy, and the roads aren't busy (not really relevant for you on your pedal-powered crotch-box) that I'd rather be on a bike than in my car.

I prefer being on two wheels than I do on four, but I would rather have a car than a bike (powered or otherwise).

You waste hours and hours of your life away too probably, trying to squeeze into your romper outfit, or try to convince people you're interesting. So we both waste a similar amount of time, just on different things.

And let's be honest my commute by car doesn't really involve any queuing as it's not really into the normal rush hour flow (when I used to work in the centre of Newbury it only took me about 15 or 20 minutes from the far end of Thatcham anyway!!

The last time I got in a queue was heading towards Bournemouth for a day when it was that lovely hot weekend a fortnight or so ago - and let's face it even being stuck in traffic for half an hour I'd have made it there before you. Even if you did have a Chris Hoy Halfords special or whatever it's called.



Nope, nothing against them at all.
Except the odd militant one who hold up traffic flow or wobble between 1 inch and 4 feet out from the curb. Also the mentality of bikers. Yes you might have the right to use the road but at the end of it, you are the smaller and more feeble beings on the road so instead of trying to be top of the food chain you should settle down into the lower ranks.. Even as a motorcyclist being probably the fastest thing on any given stretch of road, the amount of times that having the "WELL IT'S MY RIGHT....." attitude could have killed me are beyond count.

I think you also take things a little too literally.. as will no doubt be evident by your reply to my clearly, 100% serious, nothing to do with being a bit hyper on Red Bull (yes it STILL affects me..even at my age)


Well, when you're stuck in a tailback behind a cyclist, you can be happy because your jeans don't chafe.
It makes me happy too.

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Biker1
post Oct 22 2012, 08:38 AM
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This cracks me up! laugh.gif
As if Newbury's law breaking cyclists are going to take any notice of a futile sign! dry.gif
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dannyboy
post Oct 22 2012, 10:50 AM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Oct 22 2012, 09:38 AM) *
This cracks me up! laugh.gif
As if Newbury's law breaking cyclists are going to take any notice of a futile sign! dry.gif

The sign is there to exonerate the council in case of any accidents.
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Biker1
post Oct 22 2012, 10:56 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Oct 22 2012, 11:50 AM) *
The sign is there to exonerate the council in case of any accidents.

Good point and probably true!
Perhaps that is the reason for most such signs as no-one takes much notice of them.
Not much consolation when you are walking through a subway and get rammed into by a riding cyclist next to a "cyclists dismount" sign! sad.gif
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Exhausted
post Oct 22 2012, 06:52 PM
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Victoria Park sign "Danger deep water" The kiddies are going to take a lot of notice of that one much like the cyclists but if the worst happens, the powers can say "Told you so!"
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Biker1
post Oct 23 2012, 08:47 AM
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QUOTE (Exhausted @ Oct 22 2012, 07:52 PM) *
Victoria Park sign "Danger deep water" The kiddies are going to take a lot of notice of that one much like the cyclists but if the worst happens, the powers can say "Told you so!"

The difference here, of course, is that the "Danger Deep Water" sign is a warning, whereas the signs for the cyclists are direct requests.
Are we saying here that cyclists are immune to all direction signs? unsure.gif
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Ron
post Oct 23 2012, 09:22 AM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Oct 23 2012, 09:47 AM) *
The difference here, of course, is that the "Danger Deep Water" sign is a warning, whereas the signs for the cyclists are direct requests.
Are we saying here that cyclists are immune to all direction signs? unsure.gif

Apparently ‘Yes’. Two cyclists arrive at the RED traffic light on the canal bridge from the Wharf. Hesitate then ignored them. Part way across they meet a small bus coming in the opposite direction. They just manage to pass it. On going down the slope to Park Way they meet a single deck bus. By the time they had mounted the foot path to allow the bus past the lights had changed at the ends. You can guess what happened next when the taxi came across the bridge from the Wharf!
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dannyboy
post Oct 23 2012, 09:44 AM
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QUOTE (Ron @ Oct 23 2012, 10:22 AM) *
Apparently ‘Yes’. Two cyclists arrive at the RED traffic light on the canal bridge from the Wharf. Hesitate then ignored them. Part way across they meet a small bus coming in the opposite direction. They just manage to pass it. On going down the slope to Park Way they meet a single deck bus. By the time they had mounted the foot path to allow the bus past the lights had changed at the ends. You can guess what happened next when the taxi came across the bridge from the Wharf!

Those lights are useless when on a bike - a bike isn't big enough to trigger the sensor.
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Biker1
post Oct 23 2012, 11:32 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Oct 23 2012, 10:44 AM) *
Those lights are useless when on a bike - a bike isn't big enough to trigger the sensor.

The lights on Parkway Bridge are triggered by proximity sensors (similar to the sensors on the security light on your house) which will change the lights even if a pedestrian enters the waiting zone.
Try it next time you pass.
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dannyboy
post Oct 23 2012, 11:43 AM
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QUOTE (Biker1 @ Oct 23 2012, 12:32 PM) *
The lights on Parkway Bridge are triggered by proximity sensors (similar to the sensors on the security light on your house) which will change the lights even if a pedestrian enters the waiting zone.
Try it next time you pass.

I have tried it many times - sometimes they do indeed change, but often you just stand there.
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Biker1
post Oct 24 2012, 08:22 AM
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QUOTE (dannyboy @ Oct 23 2012, 12:43 PM) *
I have tried it many times - sometimes they do indeed change, but often you just stand there.

Well you need to move a little bit!! wink.gif
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